Bought a secondhand Sigma 10-20mm f3.5 for my Canon 60D today

After I picked it up I went to the nearest park and shot for about an hour and a half. Unfortunately, about 2 minutes in an elderly local English teacher glommed on to me and, asked if I minded her practicing her English with me for a bit, and then followed me around for the next hour and a half. Nice lady but I couldn't get to the backwoods parts of the park because she seemed determined to follow wherever I went and I didn't want to end up dealing with her breaking her hip in the back woods. Anyway, I'm very happy with the lens but going to super wide angle feels a little like learning a new instrument – composing for it seems to require a very different way of thinking. Any recommendations for articles or tutorials?

Oh, and I got invited to the elderly lady's next choir concert.

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4 thoughts on “Bought a secondhand Sigma 10-20mm f3.5 for my Canon 60D today

  1. Kira Hagen

    So far, I like it a lot, but I can tell it requires its own way of thinking about composition. Like the picture of the Sphinx from the side, showing almost the entire body? I was about 10 inches away from her shoulder. Looking through the lens is like having space flung out at you, like peering into a box that's bigger on the inside than the outside. I usually think of photography as reductive – simplify reality down into this little slice I see – and it's definitely harder with the super wide angle.

    The main things I'm thinking of using this lens for, then: Roman ruins in Turkey, where I'm headed next week, to the give the impression of vastness; campfire-lit historical re-enactor encampments (which is why I went for the f3.5 instead of the cheaper version); and exaggerating perspective on my husband's Viking club to make them look larger than life.

    You really need to have good foreground elements – the pictures I took that didn't were mostly very dull. And foreground practically means a couple inches away from your lens! So takes some getting used to. Good for the creative juices, though.

    Reply
  2. Kira Hagen

    So far, I like it a lot, but I can tell it requires its own way of thinking about composition. Like the picture of the Sphinx from the side, showing almost the entire body? I was about 10 inches away from her shoulder. Looking through the lens is like having space flung out at you, like peering into a box that's bigger on the inside than the outside. I usually think of photography as reductive – simplify reality down into this little slice I see – and it's definitely harder with the super wide angle.

    The main things I'm thinking of using this lens for, then: Roman ruins in Turkey, where I'm headed next week, to the give the impression of vastness; campfire-lit historical re-enactor encampments (which is why I went for the f3.5 instead of the cheaper version); and exaggerating perspective on my husband's Viking club to make them look larger than life.

    You really need to have good foreground elements – the pictures I took that didn't were mostly very dull. And foreground practically means a couple inches away from your lens! So takes some getting used to. Good for the creative juices, though.

    Reply

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